Regeneration
Regeneration

Generational Housing Cycles

Urban neighbourhoods are unsustainable because they are not designed for the future.

Families span generations and as children grow up, home ownership requires that they leave the community since their parents will occupy the homes for another generation.

PROVIDING HOUSING FOR YOUNG AND OLD PEOPLE WITHOUT CHILDREN INCREASES THE APPROPRIATE HOUSING AVAILABLE FOR FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN.

Regeneration

Generation Extension

People are having fewer children and are living longer. This has changed neighbourhoods because homes are retained by parents long after their children have left and children are staying longer because they are receiving more education.

Providing new housing for people without children helps to counteract the demographic changes.

COMMUNITIES WILL STAY THE SAME FOR GENERATIONS BUT ADAPT TO NEW REALITIES OF LONGEVITY.

Regeneration

Child Centred Neighbourhoods

The central component of sustainability is the concept of generations.

Generations are frequently thought of a people who share a time of birth. Actually generations are constantly being born and coexist in time.

Communities have in the past been understood as people in one place at one starting time and in fact many neighbourhoods have been exactly that.

Sustainability consequently requires that communities should not die but be continually regenerated.

SUSTAINABILITY IS CHILD CENTRED WITH THE START OF GENERATIONS GATHERED AROUND SCHOOLS.

Regeneration

Community Spatial Requirements

Retaining single family housing for families is the key to sustainable communities. The land use efficiencies of multi residential is key to optimum land use enabling non-family households to share existing communities without affecting the existing single family housing.

Mixed use development allows community services to be retained while making additional land available for residential use.

Low density obsolete single use commercial and institutional including vacant brown field also has a role to play in providing the land for adding multi-residential.

Existing greenfield sites and school and park space need not be used for housing additional families.

The diagram shows the ratio of land required to meet community household requirements in the correct proportions.

Regeneration

Community Indicators – Sustainability Profile

Communities that take sustainability seriously ensure that progress made is measurable and that uniform measurement standards are used for community comparison.

The profile covers thousands of communities in the European Union with basic local quality of life sustainability standards. An important aspect to note is that, although measurable standards are set, communities can develop their own solutions for local conditions. Variety, and innovation are encouraged.

Regeneration

Active Citizenship Profile

Countries that take environmental issues seriously ensure that progress made is measurable and that global standards are used that are applicable to developed and third world communities alike. The citizenship profile shown covers the European Union. An important aspect of this profile to note is that the standards represent global equity.

For example, resources should be used in a sustainable manner so that all countries have an equal stake in using the global environment in a responsible manner.

The greenhouse gas chart is specific to each country and is updated on a regular basis to show progress both nationally and internationally.

Regeneration