Keeping

American city planning still works on this life cycle theory developed a century ago with the original garden suburbs and became after World War II freeway accessed urban sprawl.

This planning concept is still used for Alberta schools as is shown in this EPSB 50 – 70 year life cycle continuum showing children abandoning the schools and then the school being abandoned or repurposed.

Keeping

Bench Marked Action

The urban concept of throw away schools and communities is still basic to urban planning almost everywhere. Only Alberta in Canada has made sustainable development as defined by the United Nations in 1987 a mandatory goal in all community planning which in Edmonton is the entire region, under the regional board. And this step forward was only initiated in 2006.

Sustainable Development is a unique challenge because it defines a goal of continuing world wide betterment for each and every action taken individually. Actions must be quantifiable and bench marked.

Keeping

Future Generations

Sustainable development meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.

Cities have built urban communities without making a place for more than one generation of children.

What is required is child friendly neighbourhoods which will satisfy this goal of perpetual sustainability.

Keeping

Learning From School

Schools are the keystones of communities and new generations of children are essential to urban stability by providing a child centred environment.

All other community social services are also dependent on generational support.

Retaining existing neighbourhood centres allows for social continuity and long term use of urban infrastructure is highly beneficial from a social, economic and environmental standpoint.

BUILDING MULTI GENERATION CHILD ORIENTED COMMUNITIES IS ESSENTIAL. ALL COMMUNITY SCHOOLS MUST BE RETAINED.

Keeping
Keeping

The chart shows that at first the community had over 1,200 families. With over two children per family, schools were full.

50 years later with the children gone, the community has lost half the people and the schools are empty.

THERE ARE NO EMPTY HOUSES, JUST FEWER PEOPLE IN EACH HOUSE.

Keeping

Mature Community Demographics

The diagram shows the demographic ratios of households.

In a typical mature community only one third of the single family homes have children.

This is a stable demographic that will persist over time.

TO HAVE ENOUGH CHILDREN TO RETAIN EXISTING SCHOOLS COMMUNITIES ONLY NEED MORE FAMILIES SINCE THE FAMILY HOMES ARE ALREADY THERE.

Keeping

Sustainable Solution

In communities built from 1950, housing has been mass produced and marketed with completions in a very short time. Combined with the decision to target young couples starting a family, schools built in each neighbourhood are overloaded within a few years and then empty as the next generation moves away from their parents.

Building cities this way is not sustainable and can be changed by recycling the community assets.

Adding the apartments which should have been built at the outset allows single family owners without children to move on and leave the homes for another generation, an A+ solution.